The Women’s March

Eslie Kouandi, Reporter

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What do you get when you combine a thick skinned, misogynistic authority figure, a cause, and thousands of people fed up? You guessed it! A protest. On January 17, 2017 more than a million men, women, and children participated in the women’s march to defend, protect, and voice their rights. Like the past with other wide scaled events, the Women’s March stimulated the media and stirred controversy.

“White women and white bodies can hold space on streets and shut down cities ‘peacefully’ because they are allowed to,” wrote blogger and author Luvvie Ajayi in a Facebook post(that was shared more than 6,000 times). “Black and brown people who march are assaulted by cops.” she finished.

Even though these thoughts of injustice lingered in the air as they marched, the Women’s March was not a wave of identity politics, but an empowerment of the masses. Speakers like Alicia keys, Ashley Judd, and Scarlett Johannsson sparked a flame of hope in everyone’s heart.

Ashley Judd’s recitation of “Nasty Woman”, a poem by Nina Donovan, enraged the conservative side of the media for being vulgar.  “Not as nasty as a man who looks like he bathes in Cheeto dust / a man whose words are a diss to America / Electoral College-sanctioned hate speech contaminating this national anthem… I am not as nasty as racism, fraud, conflict of interest, homophobia, sexual assault, transphobia, white supremacy, misogyny, ignorance and white privilege.”

The poem was blunt and straightforward, like a refreshing lemonade to the ears of feminist everywhere. In response to the conservative media’s backlash against her use of the word “p***y”, she responded with “I’m just quoting him… and I am really more entitled to the word because I’ve actually got one.”

Loch Raven sophomore Isabella Pinzon participated in the march “I felt really empowered and motivated to make change, I’ve always felt like I should be able to do what I want and society shouldn’t impact the way I carry myself.”

Like Pinzon, alumnus and current students of Loch Raven High School also attended the March. Some were highlighted on social media, like alumni Andre Wolff.

Picture Credits ; Colleen Hagerty
Loch Raven High School alumni, Andre Wolff, was spotlighted by journalist Colleen Hagerty on Twitter with this photo.

 

Alumni Katie Lowman participates in the March in Washington D.C. with her friend.

 

Senior Alyssa Haeger and Loch Raven High School alumni Shannon Harrar protest at the March in Washington D.C.

In refection of it all, the Women’s March is now a stamp in the fabric of history a memorable and infamous patch in the quilt of America.

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